What Is Magnesium Good For?

What Is Magnesium Good For?

Why Magnesium, And What Is It Good For?

Basically there are three reasons we can’t get enough magnesium in the diet today, and they are due to food processing, depleted soil microbiome and changes in our eating habits.

Most people are unaware of what magnesium is good for in our bodies, however researchers agree that no single dietary factor is as critical as magnesium. This essential mineral helps regulate blood sugar levels while promoting normal blood pressure and is required for producing and storing energy.

It plays an enormous role in our health, important to nearly every function and tissue in the body. It supports a healthy immune system, prevents inflammation associated with certain cancers and could potentially prevent a heart attack.

Some studies have shown a high daily magnesium intake could reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Additional studies have demonstrated that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches

It also helps your muscles and nerves function properly. It plays a role in the active transport of calcium and potassium ions across cell membranes, a process that is important to nerve impulse conduction, muscle contraction, and normal heart rhythm, as well as supporting a healthy immune system.

 A deficiency in this mineral can lead to muscle spasms, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, anxiety disorders, migraines, osteoporosis, and cerebral infarction.

Foods that Contain Magnesium

An abundant mineral in the body, it is naturally present in many foods such as

  • Bananas, strawberries, blackberries, grapefruit, and figs
  • Dark Chocolatebanana-540215_640
  • Spinach, collard greens, kale and swiss chard
  • Nuts and Seeds (squash, sunflower and pumpkin seeds,brazil nuts, cashews, pine nuts, flaxseed, and pecans )
  • Beans and Lentils (soy beans,black beans, kidney beans, white beans, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, and lentils. )
  • Fish (mackerel, wild salmon, halibut, and tuna)
  • Whole Grains (brown rice)
  • Avocados
  • Yogurt 

Contributing to the structural development of bone and required for the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and the antioxidant glutathione, magnesium is required for energy production, oxidative phosphorylation, and glycolysis, as well as for muscles to relax and keeping the blood flowing freely.

About two-thirds of this mineral in the human body is found in our bones, partly in the physical structure while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed.

However magnesium content in vegetables and grains (bread and pasta) has seen declines of up to 80% of “total” since 1950 figures . The reason is mainly due to intensive efforts to breed new varieties that have greater yield or resistance to pests, or adaptability to different climates.

There is growing evidence that suggests when you select for yield, crops grow bigger and faster, but they don’t necessarily have the ability to make or uptake nutrients at the same, increased rate.

These declines are not limited to only vegetables. 

  • Vegetables declined by 24% between 1940 and 1991.
  • Fruit declined by 17%.
  • Meat declined by 15%.
  • Cheeses declined by 26%.

Basically there are three reasons we can’t get enough of this important mineral in the diet today, and they are due to food processing, depleted soil microbiome and changes in our eating habits. The lack of magnesium and other nutrients in our crops has a direct impact on the ability to achieve sufficient amounts of this mineral in our diet.

How Can We Get Enough Magnesium In Our Diet?

In the final analysis, you may not be able to rely solely upon food alone to provide sufficient magnesium levels. Magnesium supplementation is a safe and effective way to ensure you are getting enough, and is recommended by both researchers and health practitioners when encountering common signs of low magnesium.

Some of the possible beneficial results of taking a magnesium supplementation

  • Helps you  into a deep, restful and refreshing sleep for the entire night. And it won’t make you groggy in the morning.
  • Assists to lose weight – (there is so much evidence that sleep directly affects weight)
  • It has a calming effect on your body.
  • It will keep you regular.
  • Assists in making nails and hair stronger.
  • Overall you will just feel better.
  • Discourages nighttime (or any time) leg and muscle cramps.
  • Digestion aid.

Recommendations

This product could be a lifesaver for anyone suffering from migraines, as well as many other health issues listed above. Magnesium is the second most prevalent electrolyte in the body, yet over two-thirds of us get less than the minimum recommended 400 mgs per day.

 I use Life Extension Magnesium 500 Mg Vegetarian Capsules myself and highly recommend them. They are a name brand you can trust, and their products work!

 

PS: I hope you enjoyed this article- If you have any questions  or want to leave your own personal comments, join the conversation below, I want to hear your thoughts on magnesium!

 

To your good health,

Tom

images courtesy of pixabay


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Tom
 

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 4 comments
Marith

Hi Tom,
I know that Magnesium is very importent for our health, and when I saw your list of food containing this mineral, I was sure I needed more. So I tried your Life Extension Magnesium 500 Mg Vegetarian Capsules, and after just 5 weeks I feel like a new and better person. I finally got rid of my leg cramps that wakes me up almost every night, and I lost 5 kilos these 5 weeks without doing anything…just finally got a full night’s sleep..every night. Thanks for the recommandation, this really works.
Marith

Reply
    Tom

    Hi Marith- Thrilled to hear that you’re leg cramps are gone and you are getting a better nights sleep. Like I said “Most researchers agree that no single dietary factor is as critical as magnesium.”

    Reply
Laura

Hi Tom,

That is a very good article. I didn’t know magnesium is that important. I usually take some supplements for my leg cramps, just like Marith said here, and the problems always solves in couple of days.

And I also know that the lack of it can trigger an autoimmune disease that I have, Hashimoto Thyroid. Magnesium can help diminish the symptoms, yet this cannot be exactly proven, not like you would know if a cramp is in your leg or not. But the specialists say it’s good, so, yes, I take magnesium for that, too.
Unfortunately only when I remember. 🙁

What I do is take raw honey, which is a mix of all the necessary substances we need.
Well, I’m in the honey business, can’t help it.

again, great info here. thanks.

Laura
healthywithhoney.com

Reply
    Tom

    Hi Laura-Yes indeed, magnesium helps your muscles and nerves function properly. It plays a role in the active transport of calcium and potassium ions across cell membranes, a process that is important to nerve impulse conduction, muscle contraction, and normal heart rhythm, as well as supporting a healthy immune system. So you see, we really do need to insure that we are getting enough magnesium in our diet…

    Reply

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